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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
on his own people. mohammed jamjoom joins us with that part of the story. >> reporter: state officials have said they believe syrians are loading chemical weapons, precursors for sarin, a deadly nerve gas on to aerial bomb that is could be dropped on the syrian people. monday cnn reported that u.s. officials believed that the syrians had begun mixing chemicals that could be used to weaponize sarin, but there were no signs that the syrian regime was going to do anything with those weapons. they maintain yet again today that they have no intention of using chemical weapons in syria. carol? >> mohammed jamjoom in beirut this morning. >>> sad ending for a month-long search of two missing cousins. the bodies of 8-year-old elizabeth collins and 10-year-old lyric cook were found by hunters in the wooded area. the two girls have been missing since july. jim spellman has been following the story since lyric and elizabeth went missing. you know, i know the families were hopeful till the end. what a saddened. >> yeah, indeed. we haven't gotten official word from police that the two podiatries fou
mohamed morsi put in place his new voting rules as the protests turn violent ahead of the saturday's vote on the controversial constitutional referendum. the new rules restrict voters from casting their ballots outside their electoral districts which had been allowed in the past. this announcement comes just hours after masked gunmen attacked these opposition protesters, happening overnight in cairo's tahrir square. nine protesters were injured, four of them critically. their attackers fired bird shot pellets, threw molotov cocktails. what will the new voter rules mean for this week's referendum? >> reporter: i don't know if you hear me. i'm having trouble hearing you. but about an hour ago -- >> we're having a tough time hearing reza. we're going to work on that connection and bring him back up. because it is important to talk about what is happening now in anticipation of the weekend. let me get you caught up, though, on our lead story out of michigan. take a look. >> vo >> veto! >> the republican-led legislature passed two right to work bills just within this past hour. one is for publ
of cairo and dueling protesters for and against the president there, mohammed morsi. they're facing off yet again this hour. these are the scenes they're sealing on a daily basis now. the issue is a referendum on a draft constitution that has been ordered by president morsi and scheduled for saturday. this coming saturday. morsi has deployed the army to maintain order and has given them sweeping powers to arrest civilians in the streets. reza sayah is in cairo outside of the presidential palace. give me an update on how things are today and if anything is changing or if it's getting any worse. >> reporter: well, for now, ashleigh, we're happy to report that things are peaceful and calm, but we're going to keep a close eye on the comes hours, because there's certainly there's the possibility of things getting ugly and more violence. that's because both sides in this conflict have once again called for mass demonstrations. the opposition factions, the critics to the president, have called for marches that have started and they're going to culminate and end up where we are at the presidential
about several things. first of all, all concerning president mohammed morsi and this growing perception that he is making himself too powerful. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. >> opposition factions back protesting against mohammed morrissey for nearly two weeks. most of the protests have been limited to tahrir square, but they're now going to the source of their anger, president morrissey, and his presidential palace. >> why come here? >> because it's -- we got fed up. >> he doesn't respect us. he don't want to listen to our demands. >> reporter: what's your message to him by coming out here? >> that what he is doing is completely unfair. this is not what we asked for. it's complete dictatorship. >> reporter: at one point there were tense moments when protests clashed with police and broke through a police barrier, but things called down pretty quickly. the president in no danger. he left at some point. the protests continue empassioned but peaceful. there you hear the chants of dictator, dictator. like much of egypt, most of these people are muslims, but you'll also find the moderates,
fighting since the election of egypt's mohammed morsi. the army called in the tanks when the protesters got close to the presidential palace. soldiers and armored vehicles shut down a demonstration by both supporters and opponents of the president. they left behind piles of rubble, burning cars, month sense of stability as a major nationwide vote gets one day closer. president morsi said a few hours ago he is going to address the egyptian people. he has not yet, but when that happens, we're going to bring that to you live. >>> nerve agents locked and loaded ready to be used against a syrian people. now, that scenario now a reality. that is according to nbc news. now, it says that syria's military has loaded the component chemicals for the deadly nerve gas into aerial bombs that could be dropped from their fighter jets. i want to bring in paula gorani about this because you have a different take on this. i know there's a lot of breath held. you say that they're not necessarily on that path. >> i believe that there's analysis that is very critical that the assad regime is not getting ready to
waiting for president mohammed morsi to speak. this is after a night of violent clashes that killed six people and killed more than 670 injured. tanks, armored personnel carriers clearing the area, scattering clouds of 0 protesters fighting in the streets. the latest spiral of violence after morsi's sweeping power grab. supporters of the muslim brotherhood who back president morsi clashing with opponents saying he made himself a dictator. reza sayah in cairo, the president not spoken. when he does, what might he say? >> reporter: well, nobody really knows what he's going to say other than members of his inner circle, but certainly, there's a lot of pressure on president morsi to calm down this conflict that's been escalating over a few days, especially the last night. we've eagerly waiting for him to speak, but he hasn't spoken yet. we're not quite sure what the delay is. initially, word was that at 6:00 p.m. local time, three and a half hours ago, he was going to deliver his speech and then reports came that this was going to be a taped speech. taped the address. dlifed it to state med
. mohammed, give us a sense. this is a pretty big fish for somebody to be leaving,nd i imagine he has valuable information as well being somebody part of the military police. >> reporter: that's right, suzanne. he identifies himself as a major general, that he's the chief of military police in syria. we spoke earlier with rebel free syrian army spokespeople. they said this was the man he claimed to be. the free syrian army helped to shuttle him to safety. it was a very difficult journey getting him from inside syria into neighboring turkey. it took far longer than they thought it would, and they were willing to help. other military officials wanted to defect for a certain amount of time longer. yes, as you said, if this turns out to be true and this man is as high-ranking as he said he is, this is a big blow to the regime. there's more and more high level defections the last several months. the fact more and more are coming seems to suggest he's losing more of a grip of power in syria. this is he not what they want out there when you have the u.n. and arab league enjoy trying to negot
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)